THE COLLAPSE OF A WAYNE COUNTY LANDMARK

DICKSON BRIDGE WHILE ERECTED
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SIDE VIEW FACING MOORE ROAD

PICTURE OF DICKSON BRIDGE PRIOR TO COLLAPSE
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I AQUIRED THIS PHOTO JUST A FEW MONTHS AGO

On June 26, 2007, the Dickson Dam Bridge collapsed.  Therefore,I have decided to provide photography before and after the span fell.

(Dickson, WV- WSAZ TV) A bridge over Twelve Pole Creek in Wayne County used by area families has collapsed with an AEP truck on it. This happened in an area known as Dickson Dam that's near Lavallette by SugarWood Golf Course. Pictures were sent in from an e-reporter. There was an American Electric Power truck on the bridge when it collapsed dropping some 25 feet into a creek. Dispatchers tell us the driver of that American Electric Power truck, Steve Smith, was not hurt and is one of the people who lives near the bridge. He was in the truck when the bridge dropped. He had to climb up the bank to get to safety. The bridge and it’s steal girders are completely in the water.The bridge has a 3 ton weight limit and the Division of Highways say the AEP truck involved in the accident weighed nearly double that, close to six tons. Highway workers say it's still to early to tell what caused the collapse. The state says the bridge was last inspected in November of last year. It was set to be replaced in 2010. This accident could lead to emergency funding for a replacement.The bridge was built back in 1920, and this morning it came right off it's foundation. There is an alternate route out of the community, but it is an extra mile in distance. The bridge is just off route 152 at Dickson between Lavallette, and Wayne. Neighbors who cross the bridge every day are just thankful no one was hurt or killed.

DICKSON BRIDGE, DICKSON, WV
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HERE IS A PHOTO OF THE COLLAPSED BRIDGE

DICKSON BRIDGE
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TWISTED AND MANGLED METAL IS ABOUT ALL THAT IS LEFT

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COLLAPSED BRIDGE- JUNE 26, 2006
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ANOTHER PHOTO OF THE COLLAPSED BRIDGE

SOME SPECULATE THE AP TRUCK
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WAS INSTRUMENTAL IN CAUSING THE COLLAPSE

TOP STRUCTURE OF MANGLED BRIDGE
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THIS WAS A PRETTY SCENE PRIOR TO WHAT EVER WENT WRONG

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Besides fishing here at Dickson Dam many years ago, my son Mark J.R. 26 recently caught a red eyed cat fish several feet in length from the head waters above Dickson Dam. Furthermore, there have been reports of really large fish bitting at Dickson Dam for the past few weeks. However, what compells me to write a story concerning loss of the historical landmark is no matter how the damage will be fixed, nothing will ever be able to replace the eligent beauty that could be enjoyed all day long at the dam. And most importantly, since the dam was adjacent to the bridge, no doubt fishing will suffer in the immediate area for a while. And some fish may have died as a result of being knocked in the head by the heavy pieces of iron. Anyway, here goes some inserts from previous portions of my Marshall assignment for Appalachian Anthropology {The Title " Two little dams in Wayne County, origionally constructed for grist mills.}
 

DICKSON DAM- FALL’S OF 12 POLE GRISTMILL

{The FIRST DICKSON DAM}

THE DICKSON DAM BRIDGE WAS JUST FEET AWAY FROM THE ROTTED GRIST MILL WHICH WAS OPERATED DURING THE EIGHTEEN AND EARLY 19TH CENTURY

As mentioned, the first dam was built for powering a gristmill.(Hardesty,1884;) According to this source, Chester Howell constructed the first gristmill in 12 Pole, at today’s Dickson Dam location during 1805. On the 1884, map located in the appendix, the Falls of 12 Pole Post Office is located halfway between the Buffalo Shoals Post Office and Trout’s Hill, Wayne County Court House. Initially, the land where the dam was built was part of a John P. Duval Grant. Later, this area, along with thousands of acres of surrounding land was willed to heirs of Duval, upon his death in 1803. Nancy Duval Drown was among those individuals to receive a large portion of his heir. According to reports, Nancy, later, sold a portion of the land to individuals; including the Spurlock Brothers. I should also point out that the gristmill constructed by Chester Howell, later became owned by Stephen Spurlock, and later his son Jesse, who operated it for several years. Dickson’s famed grist mill, right of the bridge, was the first of its kind in the area. “Photograph taken from the Huntington Herald Advertiser.” During the previous semester at Marshall University, I found myself desiring to complete an assignment that would hightlight historical landmarks and, most importantly, how they are still utilized today. One bit of common historical knowledge tells us dams were usually constructed near grist mills per requirement for mechanically turning a paddle-wheel for grinding power. 

 Mark Clay

GRIST MILL- FALLS OF 12 POLE
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THIS MILL SAT IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO DICKSON BRIDGE