THE WYLC LIVE AUDIO STREAM IS A REPLACEMENT FOR FM 98.1

THIS PHOTO IS FROM 1999
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OUTPUT POWER WAS AT NEAR 9 WATTS

WYLC MAIN AUDIO CONSOLE
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AMPRO 70'S 12 CHANNEL STEREO CONSOLE

Believe it or not, at one time there was actually an FM radio station located up a rural hollow, just 3 miles south-west of Lavelette, West Virginia. The radio station was actually more powerful than many LPFM licensed radio stations. Before building the small radio station, I really believed I would qualify for an LPFM license.

And too, before constructing a small radio station many questions entered my mind:

First, if were to put this thing on the air, what will I use to identify it? Two things prompted me to identify it as WYLC. Then, I was broadcasting in Mono, therefore, all stereo signals consist of an (L-R), whereas, all mono signals consist of ( L+ R). Since I was located on Lynn Creek Road, I decided that W is the prefix since in fact we are east of the Mississippi River. Then, proceeding the W, I figured Y would suffice the usage of so many "y" adapters utilized in the studio for coupling/combining stereo audio into mono audio. Then, the remaining portion of the callsign, the last two letters merely was used because of the radio station being located on Lynn Creek. So, there you have it. W- east of the Mississippi River, followed by "y" for mono (FM), proceeded by LC, for Lynn Creek. The identification actually includes the small community of Dickson. Essentially, we are located straight across the mountain from Dickson. So, it makes more since to use Dickson, West Virginia, for identifying location. Actually, after we increased power, we often stated the fact that we served Dickson, Shoals, Lavalette, West Virginia.

When WYLC, first signed on the air on February 21, 1999, we operated at just 9 watts. I built the transmitter using a Panaxis Oscillator circuit board designed by Earnest Wilson. Then, for a power supply, I built a well designed Vellman bridge supply and used an Old Citizens Band Radio Transformer that actually supplied more current than was necessary to supply the Oscillator-Buffer- 1ST IPA and 2nd IPA stage. The 2nd IPA amplifier board was constructed by a friend on mine who resides in Canada. The transmitter would actually push more than 9 watts, but I could achieve a much cleaner signal with less spurious emission and harmonic content by casually using 9-10 watts.

The transmitter was feed to a tower about 30 feet high with an Isopole as the radiator. I figure with line loss, actually about 6 watts reached the antenna input (S0-239). We live in a hilly terrain, therefore, with 9-11 watts of transmitter power, we provided a "city grade signal" up-to 2 miles, however, could be heard sporadically up-to 5 miles.

Later, I purchased some commercial broadcast equipment which included a Nicom 300 watt FM commercial Broadcast Band Transmitter. With this transmitter and an antenna with a nominal 3 dBi gain, our coverage improved dramatically. We could actually be heard in portions of Ohio and Kentucky.

After being on the air for a few years we finally received a visit from the Federal Communications Commission. Thus, to comply with Section 301, of the 1934 Federal Communications Act, I turned off the station to avoid further issuances of NAL's as well as potentally losing my F.C.C. Operator License. Upon the final inspection, the F.C.C. inspector requested that I move the station to my website. Therefore, I did follow his recommendation and here we are. The WYLC streaming website.

Since, we continue to attempt to provide a public local service combined with content suitable for a global audience. Thus, we still place emphasis on local weather alerts as if we were still on the air. Therefore, if you are in Kansas, and you hear local weather alerts, don't be alarmed. We can only serve our immediate area with weather alerts. Although, this sounds rather odd, I attempt to use the WYLC website as if it were a local medimum. If we were to try to re-broadcast all national weather alerts, we would have no time for music. Most importantly, I do emphasize that if there is a threat of severe in our area, people should monitor NOAA weather radio broadcasts, and/or radio-television EAS affiliates. The internet is more prone to be knocked off-line during high winds than broadcast stations. In this area, cables often run along runs of trees, therefore, high winds can cause trees to fall across high quality cable/internet lines, thus, severing them and resulting in long outages.

Now, a few pictures of the WYLC website, and how we attempt to use it to replace the radio station.

Sincerely:

Mark A. Clay SR.

 

 

 

 

 

To comply with the Federal Communications Commission's Section 301, of the 1934, Communications Act, this equipment I constructed was used primarily when I first signed on the air back in 1999, with 9 watts of effective radiated power. Actually, the exciter as pictured was constructed by using a per-fabricated Pancom 100 .1 watt oscillator-buffer-PA board. Then, the Pancome .1 watt was further amplified by a circuit board built by Dave in Canada. The circuit board designed and constructed by Dave increased the .1 watt signal to nearly 1.9 watts.
 
Then, a short time later, I purchased an R-Scott Broadcast Amplifier that would produce 9 clean watts of FM driven by 1.9 watts.
 
After running on home-brew equipment for several months, I began to purchase commercial broadcast equipment.
 
By the year 2000, WYLC operated a 300 watt F.C.C. Certified Commercial Broadcast Transmitter. The Nicom was never off the air, except power outages during thunderstorms. With one exception when the exciter decided to go nuts. Then, with the back up exciter I constructed and IPA, we were back on the air within a couple of hours.
 
Staying on the air during electrical storms seemed to be easier than attempting to stay on-line during severe weather.
 
I paid the fine, and will not voilate the Commission's rules again. I attempted to get an LPFM construction permit, however, to much adjacent and co-channel FM in the area.
 
Some of the Commercial equipment was sold, and some was destroyed. Consequently, my fine was reduced to a range where it was feasible to pay.
 
What equipment you see is not in working order at the current time. If I wanted to broadcast, I could be on the air within 48 hours by over-night ordering of equipment.
But like stated, I will never risk it again.

IN-OPERABLE FM BROADCAST EQUIPMENT-AMERICAN MADE
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THIS EQUIPMENT WAS CONSTUCTED BY MARK A, CLAY

WYLC WORK BENCH AREA
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TEST EQUIPMENT OLD AS THE HILLS

EICO VINTAGE TEST EQUIPMENT
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THIS PIECES USE ELECTON TUBES

Above; Eico Audio Fequency Generator, Eico Radio Frequency Generator, and Eico Signal Tracer, including an old Eico TV-FM Sweep Generator. I would sell the TV-FM Sweep Generator for $15.00, I don't need it.

HP 531 COMPUTER
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THIS IS THE MAIN COMPUTER USED FOR THE WEBSITE

The computer used for both the Website construction, as well as, up-loading of live audio streaming is a Hewlett Packard HP Pavillion 531w.
The comper utilizes a 1.3 GHZ. Intel Processor, with upgraded random access memory (RAM) @ 512 MB. In addition, this computer is connectd to a Belkin Model# 550 VA, that can permit us to remain online up-to 20 minutes after a power failure. Most photography posted on the website was taken using an HP model # 318 2.1 Megapixel digital camera.

SIDE VIEW OF CABLE MODEM ANDLINKSYS ROUTER,
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VONAGE CONVERTER BOX VioP SEATED ATOP OF THE ROUTER

CABLE-INTERNET MODEM, ROUTER, VONAGE CONVERTER
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VoIP/ VONAGE DIGITAL TELEPHONE CONVERTER BOX
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YES, WE GET OUR TELEPHONE SERVICE OVER THE INTERNET

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TELEPHONE JUNCTION BOX
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BROADCAST ELECTRONICS STEREO AUDIO CONSOLE
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THIS CONSOLE NEEDS SOME TLC, IT TOO WAS MANUFACTURED DURING THE 70'S

I HAVE THE MONO VERSION OF THIS BE -STEREO CONSOLE. THIS ONE INCLUDES PRE-AMP/LINE AMP CARDS, CUE AMP, HEADPHONE AMP, HOWEVER, I NEED TO EITHER PURCHASE A BE MONITOR AMP, OR CONSTRUCT ONE FOR IT.
 
THEREFORE, IF YOU HAVE A MONITOR AMP CARD FOR SALE, PLEASE SEND ME AN E-MAIL AT wylcradio@hotmail.com
My Phone-   (304) 697-0527
Cell        -    (304) 208-6047
 
The mono version of this board came in here in pieces, inoperable. Sandy and I made a trip to New Dover, Ohio, that's east of Columbus, and purchased parts several years ago to rebuild it. It works pretty good, and furthermore, could be placed on the air with a little TLC.